NEW RESEARCH.

NEW RESEARCH.

NEW RESEARCH.

NEW RESEARCH.

Thought posted: 13th June 2018

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

new research featured

Author: 
Tash Walker, Founder

Author:
Tash Walker, Founder

Author:
Tash Walker, Founder

Author:
Tash Walker, Founder

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

You only have to consult innovation success rates to know that this is true. When 99% of new products fail but the research industry makes more than £4bn annually we have a problem. Somewhere, somehow something isn’t working.

Here is why:

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

You only have to consult innovation success rates to know that this is true. When 99% of new products fail but the research industry makes more than £4bn annually we have a problem. Somewhere, somehow something isn’t working.

Here is why:

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

You only have to consult innovation success rates to know that this is true. When 99% of new products fail but the research industry makes more than £4bn annually we have a problem. Somewhere, somehow something isn’t working.

Here is why:

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

You only have to consult innovation success rates to know that this is true. When 99% of new products fail but the research industry makes more than £4bn annually we have a problem. Somewhere, somehow something isn’t working.

Here is why:

THE TRUTH IS THAT MOST PEOPLE DON’T KNOW WHY THE HELL THEY DO THINGS...

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

You only have to consult innovation success rates to know that this is true. When 99% of new products fail but the research industry makes more than £4bn annually we have a problem. Somewhere, somehow something isn’t working.

Here is why:

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

You only have to consult innovation success rates to know that this is true. When 99% of new products fail but the research industry makes more than £4bn annually we have a problem. Somewhere, somehow something isn’t working.

Here is why:

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

You only have to consult innovation success rates to know that this is true. When 99% of new products fail but the research industry makes more than £4bn annually we have a problem. Somewhere, somehow something isn’t working.

Here is why:

In standard marketing communications, research can be a bit of an obstacle to overcome. Within innovation, research can be downright disastrous.

You only have to consult innovation success rates to know that this is true. When 99% of new products fail but the research industry makes more than £4bn annually we have a problem. Somewhere, somehow something isn’t working.

Here is why:

iphone-hero

iPhone X - innovation or line extension?

1. EGOTISM

Most innovation would barely count as an iteration. A flavour extension here, a format there. Take the new iPhone X. Innovation? Not really. It is more of a line extension if we’re honest. Sure it has new features and new technology, but put it in the hands of an iPhone user and it isn’t going to change their life anytime soon.

Same idea, same product, newer version. But telling people you are iterating doesn’t have quite the same ring to it as innovating does it?

Human beings are guilty of being their own worst enemies when it comes to designing new things. We crave attention and recognition. We make overclaim after overclaim in the pursuit of our own fame and fortune and the expense of people enjoying or finding useful the things that we have made.

So if Apple can spend 4 years and millions of dollars just iterating, it is worth remembering that line extensions can and should be seen as valuable and if we get our language right and are a bit more honest with one another I think we can also make better things.

If innovation is the wrong word, consider using words like new instead. It doesn’t determine the scale of new, or the type, just that you are changing something.

1. EGOTISM

Most innovation would barely count as an iteration. A flavour extension here, a format there. Take the new iPhone X. Innovation? Not really. It is more of a line extension if we’re honest. Sure it has new features and new technology, but put it in the hands of an iPhone user and it isn’t going to change their life anytime soon.

Same idea, same product, newer version. But telling people you are iterating doesn’t have quite the same ring to it as innovating does it?

Human beings are guilty of being their own worst enemies when it comes to designing new things. We crave attention and recognition. We make overclaim after overclaim in the pursuit of our own fame and fortune and the expense of people enjoying or finding useful the things that we have made.

So if Apple can spend 4 years and millions of dollars just iterating, it is worth remembering that line extensions can and should be seen as valuable and if we get our language right and are a bit more honest with one another I think we can also make better things.

If innovation is the wrong word, consider using words like new instead. It doesn’t determine the scale of new, or the type, just that you are changing something.

1. EGOTISM

Most innovation would barely count as an iteration. A flavour extension here, a format there. Take the new iPhone X. Innovation? Not really. It is more of a line extension if we’re honest. Sure it has new features and new technology, but put it in the hands of an iPhone user and it isn’t going to change their life anytime soon.

Same idea, same product, newer version. But telling people you are iterating doesn’t have quite the same ring to it as innovating does it?

Human beings are guilty of being their own worst enemies when it comes to designing new things. We crave attention and recognition. We make overclaim after overclaim in the pursuit of our own fame and fortune and the expense of people enjoying or finding useful the things that we have made.

So if Apple can spend 4 years and millions of dollars just iterating, it is worth remembering that line extensions can and should be seen as valuable and if we get our language right and are a bit more honest with one another I think we can also make better things.

If innovation is the wrong word, consider using words like new instead. It doesn’t determine the scale of new, or the type, just that you are changing something.

1. EGOTISM

Most innovation would barely count as an iteration. A flavour extension here, a format there. Take the new iPhone X. Innovation? Not really. It is more of a line extension if we’re honest. Sure it has new features and new technology, but put it in the hands of an iPhone user and it isn’t going to change their life anytime soon.

Same idea, same product, newer version. But telling people you are iterating doesn’t have quite the same ring to it as innovating does it?

Human beings are guilty of being their own worst enemies when it comes to designing new things. We crave attention and recognition. We make overclaim after overclaim in the pursuit of our own fame and fortune and the expense of people enjoying or finding useful the things that we have made.

So if Apple can spend 4 years and millions of dollars just iterating, it is worth remembering that line extensions can and should be seen as valuable and if we get our language right and are a bit more honest with one another I think we can also make better things.

If innovation is the wrong word, consider using words like new instead. It doesn’t determine the scale of new, or the type, just that you are changing something.

2. SELF-OBSESSION

Research is really guilty of holding a mirror up to things you already know.  

 If you want to research cereal innovation, you go and research cereal usage right?  This surely is the quickest path to madness. Research that considers the universe in which a product or service sits is much more helpful.  Want to know how to fix cereal?  Consider lunch, or dinner or in fact any other different space in time.

If innovation is the wrong word, consider using words like new instead. It doesn’t determine the scale of new, or the type, just that you are changing something.

2. SELF-OBSESSION

Research is really guilty of holding a mirror up to things you already know.  

 If you want to research cereal innovation, you go and research cereal usage right?  This surely is the quickest path to madness. Research that considers the universe in which a product or service sits is much more helpful.  Want to know how to fix cereal?  Consider lunch, or dinner or in fact any other different space in time.

If innovation is the wrong word, consider using words like new instead. It doesn’t determine the scale of new, or the type, just that you are changing something.

2. SELF-OBSESSION

Research is really guilty of holding a mirror up to things you already know.  

 If you want to research cereal innovation, you go and research cereal usage right?  This surely is the quickest path to madness. Research that considers the universe in which a product or service sits is much more helpful.  Want to know how to fix cereal?  Consider lunch, or dinner or in fact any other different space in time.

If innovation is the wrong word, consider using words like new instead. It doesn’t determine the scale of new, or the type, just that you are changing something.

2. SELF-OBSESSION

Research is really guilty of holding a mirror up to things you already know.  

 If you want to research cereal innovation, you go and research cereal usage right?  This surely is the quickest path to madness. Research that considers the universe in which a product or service sits is much more helpful.  Want to know how to fix cereal?  Consider lunch, or dinner or in fact any other different space in time.

If innovation is the wrong word, consider using words like new instead. It doesn’t determine the scale of new, or the type, just that you are changing something.

choice

3. NEEDS NOT DESIRES

I’ve said it before but people don’t really know what they want. More importantly they don’t know what they need.  It is therefore vitally important in the context of new stuff to pay attention to the frustrations and tension points in life that often go un-acknowledged. If you become obsessed with offering people a new flavour variant of crisp, they will humour you in research, they just won’t actually buy it in real life.

Humanity has ingrained more choice as being a good idea.  Even democracy to some degree is about freedom to choose. The challenge is that in every day life, more choice isn’t a good thing. It slows us down, paralyses us with indecision and generally speaking makes us a lot less happy.

You’ve most likely experienced this. Ever spent agonizing minutes trying to choose between which shoes to buy, or which wine will go well with dinner? Even when you summon up the courage to make a decision, you are always left with the nagging doubt that there might have been something better.  More choice makes your final choice less pleasurable. It creates doubt.

So when we say we desire choice, we don’t. Think carefully when you are deciding to increase the mental burden you are placing on people.  

It doesn’t mean there aren’t problems in the world to fix. Look around you, everywhere you look there are irritations and frustrations. We should reserve true innovation for fixing some of these things.

3. NEEDS NOT DESIRES

I’ve said it before but people don’t really know what they want. More importantly they don’t know what they need.  It is therefore vitally important in the context of new stuff to pay attention to the frustrations and tension points in life that often go un-acknowledged. If you become obsessed with offering people a new flavour variant of crisp, they will humour you in research, they just won’t actually buy it in real life.

Humanity has ingrained more choice as being a good idea.  Even democracy to some degree is about freedom to choose. The challenge is that in every day life, more choice isn’t a good thing. It slows us down, paralyses us with indecision and generally speaking makes us a lot less happy.

You’ve most likely experienced this. Ever spent agonizing minutes trying to choose between which shoes to buy, or which wine will go well with dinner? Even when you summon up the courage to make a decision, you are always left with the nagging doubt that there might have been something better.  More choice makes your final choice less pleasurable. It creates doubt.

So when we say we desire choice, we don’t. Think carefully when you are deciding to increase the mental burden you are placing on people.  

It doesn’t mean there aren’t problems in the world to fix. Look around you, everywhere you look there are irritations and frustrations. We should reserve true innovation for fixing some of these things.

3. NEEDS NOT DESIRES

I’ve said it before but people don’t really know what they want. More importantly they don’t know what they need.  It is therefore vitally important in the context of new stuff to pay attention to the frustrations and tension points in life that often go un-acknowledged. If you become obsessed with offering people a new flavour variant of crisp, they will humour you in research, they just won’t actually buy it in real life.

Humanity has ingrained more choice as being a good idea.  Even democracy to some degree is about freedom to choose. The challenge is that in every day life, more choice isn’t a good thing. It slows us down, paralyses us with indecision and generally speaking makes us a lot less happy.

You’ve most likely experienced this. Ever spent agonizing minutes trying to choose between which shoes to buy, or which wine will go well with dinner? Even when you summon up the courage to make a decision, you are always left with the nagging doubt that there might have been something better.  More choice makes your final choice less pleasurable. It creates doubt.

So when we say we desire choice, we don’t. Think carefully when you are deciding to increase the mental burden you are placing on people.  

It doesn’t mean there aren’t problems in the world to fix. Look around you, everywhere you look there are irritations and frustrations. We should reserve true innovation for fixing some of these things.

3. NEEDS NOT DESIRES

I’ve said it before but people don’t really know what they want. More importantly they don’t know what they need.  It is therefore vitally important in the context of new stuff to pay attention to the frustrations and tension points in life that often go un-acknowledged. If you become obsessed with offering people a new flavour variant of crisp, they will humour you in research, they just won’t actually buy it in real life.

Humanity has ingrained more choice as being a good idea.  Even democracy to some degree is about freedom to choose. The challenge is that in every day life, more choice isn’t a good thing. It slows us down, paralyses us with indecision and generally speaking makes us a lot less happy.

You’ve most likely experienced this. Ever spent agonizing minutes trying to choose between which shoes to buy, or which wine will go well with dinner? Even when you summon up the courage to make a decision, you are always left with the nagging doubt that there might have been something better.  More choice makes your final choice less pleasurable. It creates doubt.

So when we say we desire choice, we don’t. Think carefully when you are deciding to increase the mental burden you are placing on people.  

It doesn’t mean there aren’t problems in the world to fix. Look around you, everywhere you look there are irritations and frustrations. We should reserve true innovation for fixing some of these things.

4. FIXING THINGS

You can’t fix things by asking people. Asking won’t cut it.

It’s like going to a doctor’s surgery and them asking you what is wrong. You mostly don’t know or aren’t qualified to answer. You might be able to hint at the problem, or suggest the area but it is up to the doctor to observe things you don’t see to come up with a solution.

It is why we never ask people what they want. We use technology to observe people in different situations, and then conduct forced experiments on them to understand if we can make things better.

I recently read a fascinating article by an ex Grey adman Nils Leonard who said:

 

“We need to go back to what we think our job is. I don’t believe my job is to find more irritating ways to force more coffee down people’s throats. I would love them to want us in the mix.”

- Nils Leonard

 

I couldn’t agree more.

I think it’s time for us to reframe innovation.

Recognise the benefit of small changes and understand where we might need some really big ones too.

Just don’t confuse the two.

4. FIXING THINGS

You can’t fix things by asking people. Asking won’t cut it.

It’s like going to a doctor’s surgery and them asking you what is wrong. You mostly don’t know or aren’t qualified to answer. You might be able to hint at the problem, or suggest the area but it is up to the doctor to observe things you don’t see to come up with a solution.

It is why we never ask people what they want. We use technology to observe people in different situations, and then conduct forced experiments on them to understand if we can make things better.

I recently read a fascinating article by an ex Grey adman Nils Leonard who said:

 

“We need to go back to what we think our job is. I don’t believe my job is to find more irritating ways to force more coffee down people’s throats. I would love them to want us in the mix.”

- Nils Leonard

 

I couldn’t agree more.

I think it’s time for us to reframe innovation.

Recognise the benefit of small changes and understand where we might need some really big ones too.

Just don’t confuse the two.

4. FIXING THINGS

You can’t fix things by asking people. Asking won’t cut it.

It’s like going to a doctor’s surgery and them asking you what is wrong. You mostly don’t know or aren’t qualified to answer. You might be able to hint at the problem, or suggest the area but it is up to the doctor to observe things you don’t see to come up with a solution.

It is why we never ask people what they want. We use technology to observe people in different situations, and then conduct forced experiments on them to understand if we can make things better.

I recently read a fascinating article by an ex Grey adman Nils Leonard who said:

 

“We need to go back to what we think our job is. I don’t believe my job is to find more irritating ways to force more coffee down people’s throats. I would love them to want us in the mix.”

- Nils Leonard

 

I couldn’t agree more.

I think it’s time for us to reframe innovation.

Recognise the benefit of small changes and understand where we might need some really big ones too.

Just don’t confuse the two.

4. FIXING THINGS

You can’t fix things by asking people. Asking won’t cut it.

It’s like going to a doctor’s surgery and them asking you what is wrong. You mostly don’t know or aren’t qualified to answer. You might be able to hint at the problem, or suggest the area but it is up to the doctor to observe things you don’t see to come up with a solution.

It is why we never ask people what they want. We use technology to observe people in different situations, and then conduct forced experiments on them to understand if we can make things better.

I recently read a fascinating article by an ex Grey adman Nils Leonard who said:

 

“We need to go back to what we think our job is. I don’t believe my job is to find more irritating ways to force more coffee down people’s throats. I would love them to want us in the mix.”

- Nils Leonard

 

I couldn’t agree more.

I think it’s time for us to reframe innovation.

Recognise the benefit of small changes and understand where we might need some really big ones too.

Just don’t confuse the two.

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